Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 74-78
Study on Translated English Titles of The Tale of Shangri-La
Lyu Liangqiu, School of Foreign Languages, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China
Xue Jiayi, School of Foreign Languages, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China
Received: May 24, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 16, 2020;       Published: Jun. 28, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ellc.20200502.14      View  297      Downloads  49
Abstract
A classical work of traditional Chinese literature, The Tale of Shangri-La, has received extensive attention among Chinese and Western translators, which is written by Tao Yuanming, an influential writer during the Eastern Jin Dynasty. In this work, Tao Yuanming depicted an ideal society where people’s life is simple, quiet and harmonious, far away from hustle and bustle. A. R. Davis, Herbert A. Giles, James Robert Hightower, Rick Davis and David Steelman, Lin Yutang, Luo Jingguo, Roland C. Fang, Sun Dayu, Xie Baikui, Yang Xianyi, and other translators all show great interest in this work and are eager to push it into the English world, due to which, The Tale of Shangri-La, has entered the study of foreign researchers and writers. In order to discuss how to successfully translate the titles of Chinese classics into English, this paper selects ten translated English titles of The Tale of Shangri-La, and analyzes different strategies and methods used in them. It is concluded that translators should take cultural factors into consideration, and adopt the strategy of foreignization as much as possible in order to better carry forward Chinese traditional culture and promote cross-cultural communication in the process of translating the titles of Chinese classics into English.
Keywords
Translation Strategy, Foreignization, Cross-cultural Communication
To cite this article
Lyu Liangqiu, Xue Jiayi, Study on Translated English Titles of The Tale of Shangri-La, English Language, Literature & Culture. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 74-78. doi: 10.11648/j.ellc.20200502.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Tylor, Edward Burnett. Primitive Culture. London: John Murray Albemarle Street, 1871.
[2]
Lin Benchun. Cultural Globalization and Foreign Translation. Journal of Fujian Teachers University (Philosophy and Social Sciences Edition), 1999 (2): 78-81.
[3]
Pan Wenguo. Translation in and out——on the Significance of Translating Chinese Classics into English by Chinese Translators. Chinese Translators Journal, 2004 (02): 42-45.
[4]
Guo Jianzhong. Cultural Factors in Translation: Foreignization and Domestication. Journal of Foreign Languages, 1998 (02): 13-20.
[5]
Sun Zhili. Chinese Literary Translation: from Domestication to Foreignization. Chinese Translators Journal, 2002 (01): 39-43.
[6]
Sun Zhili. Again on the Strategy of Literary Translation. Chinese Translators Journal, 2003 (01): 50-53.
[7]
Cai Ping. Domestication’s Leading Role in Translation. Chinese Translators Journal, 2002 (05): 41-43.
[8]
Xu Jianping and Zhang Rongxi. Foreignization and Domestication: an Examination from the Perspective of Cross-cultural Translation. Chinese Translators Journal, 2002 (05): 38-41.
[9]
Ge Xiaoqin. Domestication /Foreignization in the Postcolonial Context——A Note of Warming to Researchers at Home. Chinese Translators Journal, 2002 (05): 34-37.
[10]
Wang Renqiang. Study on the Continuum Relationship between Foreignization and Domestication. Modern Foreign Languages, 2004 (01): 49-55+106.
[11]
Zhang Xiaoman and Hu Zuoyou. Acceptance of Domestication and Foreignization in China. Academics in China, 2009 (05): 75-82.
[12]
Qiu Nengsheng and Qiu Xiaoqin. Study on Foreignization and Domestication in Translation of English and Chinese Idioms under the Background of Cultural Differences. Shanghai Journal of Translators, 2019 (01): 51-56+95.
[13]
Venuti, Lawrence. The Translator’s Invisibility. London and New York: Routledge, 1995.
[14]
Xu Jun and Guo Yuehong. Translation of Chinese Classics: the Strategy of Foreignization and China English from the Perspective of Cultural Translation. Foreign Languages and Their Teaching, 2008 (07): 45-48.
[15]
Addison Wesley Longman Ltd. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. The Commercial Press, 2002.
[16]
Liang Yue. Analysis on Translated English Titles of A Tale of Shangri-La From the Perspective of Fouctionalism. Journal of Changchun Education Institute, 2014, 30 (17): 56-57.
[17]
Hilton, James. Lost Horizon. Yunnan: Yunnan People's Publishing House, 2018.
Browse journals by subject