Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 8-16
A Descriptive and Historical Analysis of Sanga Traditional Dance of the Asantes
Ronit Akomeah, Department of Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Faculty of Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Eric Appau Asante, Department of Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Faculty of Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Nana Ama Pokuaa Arthur, Department of Educational Innovations in Science and Technology, Faculty of Art, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Received: Jan. 8, 2019;       Accepted: Feb. 27, 2019;       Published: Mar. 20, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ellc.20190401.12      View  105      Downloads  23
Abstract
Asante traditional dances bear and portray some aspects of Asante culture; albeit, less number of these traditional dances are much performed and mostly known within Asante and other places in Ghana and overseas. The internet; being a suggestive abode of information for educational, preservation and other purposes mostly host Adowa, Kete and Fͻntͻmfrͻm amongst the vast number of Asante traditional dances. Sanga is less performed and quite uncommon as it had been orally passed down as a means of preservation. Most people have neglected Sanga and there is basically less knowledge on the dance making it currently recede. This study therefore investigates the problem to understand the embedded meanings behind Sanga dance and to also advance the need and means for the preservation of Sanga traditional dance. In using the qualitative research method, interviews and observation were the main forms of data collection instruments used for the study. Data were collected from the Head of Performing Arts and the Ammamerɛso Agofomma of the Centre for National Culture, Kumasi and the then Ɛntrɛpakuo and the head teacher of the R/C JHS, Atwima Nerebehi. Most respondents are indigenes of the Ashanti Region and had in-depth knowledge on Sanga. A sample size of 16 was selected through purposive and snowball sampling. The results of the study proved that Sanga dance forms part of Asante culture and is mostly embedded in its related cultural elements; appropriate means to accurately document such receding traditional dances are in both photography and video formats. It was recommended that the chiefs and elders of various ethnic groups in Ghana should include receding Ghanaian traditional dances to public gatherings; and bridge the gap of preserving traditional dances by using documentary videos.
Keywords
Asante Traditional Dances, Cultural Elements, Preservation of Perception and Receding Traditional Dance
To cite this article
Ronit Akomeah, Eric Appau Asante, Nana Ama Pokuaa Arthur, A Descriptive and Historical Analysis of Sanga Traditional Dance of the Asantes, English Language, Literature & Culture. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2019, pp. 8-16. doi: 10.11648/j.ellc.20190401.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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